53 Cheap Firewood Shed Ideas

Firewood sheds have different sizes. But it would help to make one that can accommodate enough wood to last your family during the winter months. The most crucial factors to consider is the number of cords of wood you use and how to keep the wood dry.

A typical cord of wood is 128 cubic feet, which is equivalent to wood stacked four feet high by four feet deep by eight feet wide. And the average American household living in a 1000-square-foot home will use three cords of wood for energy. But if you live in a warmer place or possess a more efficient wood stove, you will probably burn less wood.

However, it is better to have a large storage shed in which you can store more cords of firewood. Having more is always better than having less. If the winter months are unexpectedly brutal, you can still meet your energy needs.

The good news is that you can use existing firewood storage shed plans to build your  shed cheaply. You just need to follow the step-by-step instructions to create the perfect place for your pile of firewood.

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Firewood Storage Shed Ideas

Below are ideas you can implement to build your firewood shed. They lend themselves well to DIY projects.

23 Easy DIY Outdoor Firewood Rack I...
23 Easy DIY Outdoor Firewood Rack Ideas and Designs

1. Cheap DIY Firewood Shed

The wood plank firewood storage shed is painted blueish-gray with a metal roof, and you can build this cheap storage shed from new wood or old pallets. So, it makes for a great DIY weekend project.

2. Simple Structure for Wood

The simple firewood shed can stand on concrete blocks to keep the wood dry. You can also house it on the porch. And the unpainted structure is simply designed to store a small amount of wood, making it an easy DIY project. 

3. DIY Firewood Rack with No Tools

You can assemble this DIY firewood rack in hours with no tools. Your materials list will only consist of cinder blocks, wooden posts for the side and base, and split logs for reinforcement.

4. The Plumbing Pipe Firewood Holder

The rustic firewood holder consists of old or leftover plumbing pipes firmly attached to a reinforced wooden base. Heavy-duty casters are then attached at the bottom to enhance mobility. And it makes for a relatively easy weekend project.

5. The V-Shaped Firewood Holder

This black-painted V-shaped firewood holder stores dry firewood for easy access. It consists of two cinder blocks laid next to each other, and four painted wooden posts angled at about 45 degrees. You can assemble several of these in the areas you need them.

6. DIY Corrugated Iron Firewood Rack

This upcycled corrugated iron firewood rack can store firewood outdoors while keeping it dry. And its metallic frame at the bottom provides stability and prevents it from toppling to one side. It’s an easy project for anyone with metal-working skills.

7. DIY Wood Bin

Using firewood shed plans available online, you can build this grey firewood bin with a red roof to protect varying amounts of wood. It’s divided into two sections to separate kindling from large logs. And its design enhances the attractiveness of your outdoor space.

8. A Large Log Store

The large log store with unpainted corrugated roofing sheets is a large DIY project with a simple design that works when you need enough storage space for a large amount of firewood. It consists of corner posts to which wooden slats have been attached. And the back of the shed is similar to stabilize the structure. Also, the roof slope is slightly angled back to keep water from getting in through the front of the shed.

9. Triangular Firewood Shed

The log store uses a basic design in the form of an attractive triangle shape with a black weed fabric at the base. It is built with pressure-treated wood panels to provide a cover and supporting structure. And its tongue and groove construction will encourage rainwater run-off.

10. Cheap DIY Wood Shed

This unpainted cheap DIY wood shed uses wood pallets to form the walls, sides, and the base. And its roofing material and side cover consist of recycled corrugated iron sheets. The open floorboards allow proper ventilation and enable drying. So, have a circular saw around.

11. Cedar Firewood Shed

The firewood shed consists of cedar slats on the sides, back wall, and a slanted roof with space at the top. But it has no base, and the front side is open, making it a simple, attractive, straightforward design to implement if you want an outdoor structure to store your firewood stack.

12. Amish Built Storage Shed

The storage shed has unpainted wooden slats on the sides and the back with spacing for ventilation. The front end is open for easy access while the base is raised to reduce moisture content at the bottom. And wooden rafters hold up a painted roof to protect the firewood stacks.

13. Pallet Firewood Shed

This pallet firewood shed consists of three Oriented strand board (OSB) sheets, 21 pallets, and a metal roof. The shed is raised and divided into two. You can paint it any color you like to suit your outdoor space.

14. Cheap Pallet Firewood Rack

This affordable pallet firewood rack is small and easy to move around if you need your firewood closer to the woodstove or firepit. It is slightly raised to protect the wood from the moisture underneath. And you don’t have to paint it.

15. Lean-To Firewood Storage

The large floating lean-to log store consists of wood panels and architecture shingles. You can build it on an existing garage or a shed as pictured here. And you can leave it unpainted or paint it to match the existing structure.

16. Wood Shed with Slanted Roof

The firewood shed with a slanted roof uses the yard’s fencing as the back wall. And strong solid wooden corner posts provide stability on the other sides, while the floor consists of patio tiles. The slanted roof encourages rainwater run-off into the designated drainage area.

17. Large Outdoor Firewood Storage Shed

The large outdoor firewood storage shed is divided into two by a passage that allows easy access to the wood from the inside. Its base lies on multiple stone layers, and the sides are also open for easy access. In addition, it includes corrugated metal roofing to protect the wood underneath.

18. Dual Purpose Firewood Shed

The above floating dual-purpose firewood storage shed stores a lot of wood on one side, and the other provides storage for yard equipment and toys on the other. Its wood shingles offer overhead protection, and the open side is for easy wood access.

19. Metallic Mesh Wood Shed

The metallic mesh woodshed uses the home’s roof overhang to protect the wood underneath. And silver-painted metal posts stabilize the entire structure, while silvery metallic mesh secures the side walls. Also, the floor includes a similarly painted metal panel.

20. Three-Sided Firewood Shed

The three-sided cypress woodshed is attractively designed to provides easy access to the wood while enhancing your outdoor space. But it has a wooden back wall with lattice on the upper side for structural stability and adequate ventilation. In addition, its slanted roof encourages rain run-off.

21. Corrugated Metal Wood Shed

This corrugated metal roofing shed makes for a good firewood shed utilizing recycled metal sheets and wood panels. It also has corrugated metal that protects the wood from the side and top while making it accessible on one side. And there is no need to paint anything – it’s already rustic.

22. Luxurious Log Store

The luxurious log store consists of three bays made of wood siding on the side and back and panels at the bottom. It is raised to reduce moisture content at the bottom. And it also includes reclaimed tile as roofing.

23. Metallic Firewood Rack

The black metallic firewood rack incorporates eight metal rods on the sides for structural support. And it can accommodate slightly over half a cord of wood. Its painted metal panel roofing provides overhead protection.

24. Three-Cord Wooden Shed

The above wooden shed can hold as many as three cords of firewood. Its blue slanted metal roofing complements the white wooden posts used for structural stability and the red wooden horizontal panels on the sides and back wall.

25. Galvanized Steel Dual Purpose Shed

The L-shaped storage shed consists of black galvanized steel for the side and roof. One side can accommodate many firewood logs, while the other can store garden stools and supplies safely.

26. Upcycled Fencing Firewood Shed

This firewood shed consists of recycled greying old fencing used for the base, sides, and back wall. Reclaimed wood panels have also been used for the roof. There is no need to paint because the fencing already has a weathered rustic look.

27. Wood Shed with Shingles

This wood shed consists of unpainted wood panels on three sides and the base. The front end is open for ventilation and easy access to firewood. And it also includes wooden roof rafters to support the roof shingles that cover the wood.

28. Forest Green Wood Shed

The above forest green firewood shed consists of wood panels on the sides, base, and sloped roof. It has adequate spacing for ventilation. And it is painted forest green to blend in with the surroundings.

29. Triangular Metallic Log Store

The metallic log store consists of three metal panels attached to form a triangular shape. The base has been raised to keep the wood dry. And it is stylish enough to use both indoors and outdoors.

30. Gable Roof Steel Wood Shed

This dual-purpose steel shed contains storage for firewood on one side, which has three metal walls and an open side. The other side incorporates storage for your machine and garden equipment. And the gable roofing enhances rain run-off.

31.  Cinder Block Firewood Shed

The multi-tiered cinder blocks work as a shed for storing wood. They require no construction and only need a narrow vertical space for stacking. And you can have several vertical columns placed in convenient locations.

32. Tented Firewood Seasoning Shed

This white tented shed only requires installing the powder-coated steel frame and polythene material. It is a great size and has enough room for several cords of wood. And you can easily open and close the zip to improve ventilation or stack the wood and remove it when needed.

33. Circular Metallic Long Store

This circular metallic log store consists of rustic or powder-coated steel metal panels fabricated into a circular shape. And it also has several sections created from similar metallic panels welded together. You can lean it against the wall and under the overhang for added firewood protection.

34. Steel Roof Panel Log Store

This firewood shed consists of galvanized steel roof panels and additional steel panels on the side. It’s painted grey and leaves a small footprint, making it stylish and suitable for any outdoor yard. And it is raised for proper ventilation. Also, it is easy to assemble and install, making it an easy DIY project.

35. Prefab Firewood Shed

This prefab firewood shed, painted white, and grey is raised to prevent moisture entry from the bottom. And it has a painted metal roof with an overhang to prevent water from getting into the wood from the open front end. You can use free plans to build or assemble a similar shed quickly.

36. Wood Shed with Upcycled Pallet Floors

The above firewood shed consists of recycled pallet floors and veneer boards for the sides. The roofing is transparent plastic covers attached to a slanted wooden support structure that lets in light while protecting the firewood logs from the water run-off.

37. Firewood Shed with Concrete Base

This large firewood shed has a concrete slab as a base to withstand the immense pressure from many cords of wood. The primary materials are stained wood panels spaced out for proper airflow. And the metal roofing provides protection and incorporates an overhang to accommodate more stored firewood on the sides. In addition, the large shed provides plenty of room for any garden equipment and supplies you may have.

38. Stylish Brick Firewood Store

This open firewood store consists of a grey brick wall that matches the home’s external walls and a concrete pad. It also utilizes the existing roof’s overhang and wooden ceiling as overhead protection.

39. Multi-Functional Metal Frame Firewood Shed

The multi-functional firewood shed consists of a metal frame to support the firewood, which acts as privacy walls for the enclosed space within. And the frame also supports the roof protecting the firewood underneath. In addition, it serves as a base for a rooftop garden.

40. Dark-Stained Wood Shed

The above firewood shed with two firewood bays incorporates wood slats at the base and walls. It also consists of a slanted wooden roof to enhance rain and snow run-off. And it is stained dark to blend in with the surroundings. In addition, it has an open front end for easy access to firewood.

41. Stone Wall Firewood Shed

This shed is the best way to install a privacy wall for your outdoor kitchen while making your firewood accessible for cooking and heating purposes. It consists of stone walls built with rectangular nooks into which the firewood is placed to keep it dry. But the front end is open, so you can access your logs easily.

42. Stylish Firewood Store

This stylish firewood store consists of a fabricated metallic frame to create multiple uneven sections in which you can store firewood. It is painted black and creates a rustic effect in the outdoors. And it uses an existing wall as a back wall for the firewood while providing a functional focal point for the yard.

43. Blue Firewood Shed with Roof

The firewood shed consists of dark blue wood panels for the back wall and sides to match the existing fencing, while the base uses unpainted wood slats. And the roof is also dark blue to blend with its surroundings. In addition, it slants toward the fencing and away from the open front side. That helps to keep water away from the firewood.

44. Upcycled Circular Wood Shed

You can have your own firewood storage shed by recycling old heating pipes and gratings from some old gas stoves. The metal acts as a roof structure that protects the firewood stacked in the center. And the black paint helps the metal last longer and blend within its surroundings.

45. Recycled Pallet Log Store

The sectional firewood shed uses recycled pallets to house the wood logs and scaffolding boards for structural support. It also incorporates recycled roof tiles as overhead protection for the firewood underneath while using the existing perimeter fence as the back wall support. And tree branch dowels help to tie everything up together.

46. Lean-To Wood Shed

The lean-to firewood shed consists of wooden corner posts and a wooden base for structural stability and siding similar to the main house. Also, it has a roof similar to the existing home, so it blends. And the shed uses one of the home’s walls as the back wall.

47. Recycled Tank Wood Store

The old plastic tank is cut cross-sectionally and longitudinally to create a semi-circle container that can lie flat on the ground, thus providing overhead protection for the firewood. And the closed back end ensures the firewood shed has a back wall. Also, its base is brick to withstand the wood pressure while keeping it moisture free and matching the outdoor brick pathway.

48. Wood Shed on Uneven Ground

This simple wood shed consists of four uneven wood posts that provide structural support when building on a slopy terrain. They also support the slanted metal roof on rafters, draining water away from the wood. The front and back ends are open for easy wood stacking and access.

49. Compact Dual-Tier Wood Shed

The compact dual-tier firewood shed incorporates four structural support posts and two bases. Its metallic roof slants toward the front end and covers the back end of the higher tier to protect the firewood from water run-off. And the lower-tier enjoys protection from the first-tier base and roof overhang. Also, the entire shed is unpainted, thus lessening the work you need to do.

50. Innovative Hexagonal Log Store

The above log store innovatively incorporates several thick metal panels joined to form a hexagonal shape. As a result, each section acts as a semi-autonomous firewood store. First, however, they are riveted together to form a much larger firewood shed that uses the primary home’s main wall as its back wall.

51. Washing Machine Wood Store

This tiny wood store uses a recycled washing machine drum as a container for firewood. You can store it underneath a roof overhang or on the porch for easy firewood access. And you can leave it unpainted or paint it to suit whichever color scheme you prefer.

52. Recycled Awning Wood Shed

The above firewood shed consists of a recycled aluminum awning attached to an old shed for additional support. And the awning’s fabric acts as the roof, thus preventing the wood underneath from getting wet.

53. Log Store with Shelf

This log store consists of two sections. The upper section is a shelf for firewood equipment or kindling, while the lower side is for firewood. The shed consists of wood slats on the side, back, and base to provide additional structural support and adequate ventilation. And the metal roof slats backward to enhance rain and snow run-off away from the open end of the shed.

How Big Should a Firewood Shed Be?

A good rule of thumb is to allow for at least two cords of wood per 40 to 80 square feet of floor space. You need enough room to be able to walk-in the shed and move around to gather wood when needed. A typical cord of firewood neatly stacked that is 4 feet deep x 4 feet high x 8 feet tall needs 128 cubic feet.

Based on these dimensions, a standard 5 ft x 8 ft firewood shed will hold 2 cords of firewood. A 10 feet wide by 8 feet deep shed is large enough to hold a full winter’s supply of my firewood. Here are some shed size examples:

Cords of FirewoodShed Size WxLxH
25’x8’x8′
35’x12’x8′
410’x8’x8′ or 5’x16’x8′
610’x12’x8′
810’x16’x8′

Frequently Asked Questions

Should Firewood be Covered?

Firewood dries out faster if left uncovered, but this isn’t always feasible when rain, snow, and ice are present. The best way cover firewood is to store it in a designated location with a roof over it without obstructing air flow around the firewood. A good covering over the top of your woodpile will protect it while also allowing moisture to escape away from the base.

Will Firewood Dry in a Shed?

Firewood will dry out and season in a firewood shed. However, there are a few things to consider before doing so. Firewood should be dried for at least six months before burning. The ideal moisture content for firewood is 20% or less. timber vs lumber If the wood is too wet, it will produce more smoke and less heat. If the wood is too dry, it will burn too quickly and produce less heat.

How to Get Firewood Dry Faster?

There are a few things you can do to speed up the drying process. One is to split the logs into smaller pieces. This will increase the surface area and allow the moisture to evaporate more quickly. Another is to stack the firewood in a way that allows air to circulate around it. This will also help the moisture to evaporate more quickly.

If you live in an area with high humidity, you may need to take additional steps to dry your firewood. One option is to use a dehumidifier in the shed. This will help remove some of the moisture from the air and speed up the drying process.

How Much Does it Cost to Build a Firewood Shed?

The cost of building a firewood shed really depends on the size and complexity of the design. If you’re handy with tools and comfortable working with timber, you can easily build a small shed for around $200 in materials. You can even purpose old wood pallet boards to use on the outer walls. You’ll need materials like lumber, fasteners, and shingles or metal for roofing.

However, if you need to hire someone to do it for you, the cost will be closer to $1000.

Does Firewood Dry Under a Tarp?

Tarp as a method of covering your firewood is very simple to use. Wood will dry under a tarp. What’s important is that the firwwood be elevated off the ground and the tarp should cover the top of the wood pile. Fully covering the woodpile can hold moisture inside as the wood needs airflow to dry out.

Does Firewood Attract Termites?

Firewood needs to be stored outside but it can attract termites, therefore it should never be placed directly on the ground or against your house. Wood directly on the ground can absorb water, which attracts termites. Ideally, firewood needs to be elevated off the ground in a designated location away from your house.

Are Dead Trees Good Firewood?

It’s usually safe to collect firewood from a fallen tree. Some trees produce superior wood than others, so you should consider the species of fallen tree before harvesting it.

In general, hardwood trees produce better firewood than softwood species. Hardwoods are heavier and have less sap than softwoods, meaning they burn hotter and stay longer.

Beech, hickory, cherry, ash, maple, and oak are examples of common hardwoods. Cedar, spruce, yew, pine, and redwood are examples of softwoods.

If your fallen tree is hardwood, you’ll can harvest the tree. For softwood, it’s best to call in a professional tree removal service rather than cutting it for firewood.

Photo of author

Hubert Miles

I've been conducting home inspections for 17 years. I'm a licensed Home Inspector, Certified Master Inspector (CMI), and FHA 203k Consultant. I started HomeInspectionInsider.com to help people better understand the home inspection process and answer questions about homeownership and home maintenance.
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