10 Baits To Use To Catch A Weasel

Do you have a weasel problem you would like to eliminate? If you are looking for bait to catch them, that probably means you do not want to hurt the little guys. Fortunately, you can use plenty of options to do this task.

Weasels are carnivores, so this means that they will need meat bait. There are 10 baits you can use for a weasel.

  1. Raw liver
  2. Raw fish
  3. Raw chicken
  4. Raw rabbit
  5. Raw turkey necks
  6. Raw lamb
  7. Raw ground beef
  8. Cooked eggs
  9. Cat treats
  10. Kitten food
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Baits are an easy method of luring weasels, but what kind of traps should you use, or is there a way to repel weasels from coming and going through your yard all day and night?

Well, of course, there is! We will go over all of this in the article as you continue to read, along with ten different types of raw meat you can use to lure them in. 

What Baits Work Best When Trying To Catch A Weasel?

When you want to rid yourself of a weasel problem, the easiest solution is to call an exterminator. The exterminator will come out and trap or kill the weasels that are running in your yard. However, you can do this yourself, especially if you do not wish to hurt these creatures. 

When looking at different types of bait you can use for weasels. You must know that they are carnivores, meaning they exclusively eat meat and hunt animals and bugs to eat. Considering that, raw meat, preferably pungent meat, works best.

Something else you could do is if you have some mice on your property, you can lead the mice into your traps with a line of oats. The weasels will eventually come to hunt the mice in the traps. This way, you can potentially take care of two issues at once.

Although, if you have a mice problem on your property, it’s probably better to leave the weasels alone. This way, they can do their job and eat all of the mice before you try to get rid of the weasels.

If that is not an option for you and you have both a weasel and a mouse problem calling an exterminator is the best and easiest way to take care of this issue.

10 Best Baits To Use:

  • Raw liver
  • Raw fish
  • Raw chicken
  • Raw rabbit
  • Raw turkey necks
  • Raw lamb
  • Raw ground beef
  • Cooked eggs
  • Cat treats
  • Kitten food

All of these baits are perfect to use to trap weasels in your traps. These bait options are savory enough to attract the weasels in question—especially the raw meat options we have provided above.

After about an hour, the raw meat will start to stink enough for the weasels to come running.

What Traps Do You Use When Trapping Weasels?

Along with the bait section above, you will need traps to catch the weasels if you do not have some already. Weasels are a small species of rodent, most of the time.

Depending on the size of your species, you will need either small or extra small traps. The traps in question are the same as pest control professionals use. The ones you see when they try to trap raccoons, possums, or cats are just a lot smaller. 

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08/16/2022 08:13 pm GMT

You can use the 1 or 2-door traps; either would work. However, pest control professionals prefer and recommend using the one-door trap option. This is because of their simplicity and much easier to set up.

There is still a benefit to using the two-door system because both doors are open. A two-door trap allows the weasels and other pests to see through the trap completely without obstructing the bard on the other side of the cul-de-sac. This can put the pest in question at ease when they are entering the trap.

Wear gloves when handling and setting up the trap; weasels are clever creatures and can smell the odor you leave on the cage, which can deter the rodents from coming near the mine in the first place.

Set traps near damaged areas alongside your fence, barns, and house. If you have not found any noticeable damage, put the traps next to the water source you suspect the weasels to be drinking from to stay hydrated.

Traps are usually more effective if you slightly bury them. Dig a shallow hole of 1 to 1.5 inches deep to put your trap in, and camouflage the cage with some foliage and dirt from the surrounding area.

Covering it up will help ensure that the weasels will not be frightened of the shiny metal bars of the trap you just placed for them. Once the trap is set, place your bait and check back every few hours to see if you caught yourself a weasel or two.

Congratulations, You Caught A Weasel!

When you have noticed you have finally caught one of those pesky weasels, it is time to remove them from your property. Be sure to wear gloves when handling the cage with a weasel in it.

Weasels are known to bite, and their sharp teeth can hurt and draw blood. So it would be best if you did not put your fingers in the trap. 

Approach the trap calmly and collect. Try not to startle the weasel. Slowly pick up the trap in question and move it to your vehicle. Doing this will help keep the weasel calm and not stress the rodent out as much as possible. 

Once you have the weasel in your vehicle, take them away about 10 miles from your home, near a water source but not close to or on another person’s property. Set the cage down carefully and open the trap.

Either the weasel will dart out at the first opportunity, or it may be too scared to leave immediately. In that case, back up about 10 or 15 feet and wait for the weasel to go. Eventually, the weasel will work up the courage to dart out and disappear.

Go ahead and head back home with your trap and repeat the process until you no longer have a weasel problem on your property.

Sprinkler

How To Prevent Weasels From Pestering Your Property

When looking into prevention, you are talking about keeping the weasels out of your yard entirely. You can do this through numerous methods, but they are all best used in conjunction with each other to achieve the same goal.

1. Keeping Your Lawn Clean

Firstly make your yard less welcoming to weasels. Weasels like tall grass and bushes and shrubs, allowing them to hide from their prey when hunting while also letting them hide from their predators.

Keeping up on lawn care is the first thing you should do when looking into weasel prevention.

This would mean regularly mowing your lawn, trimming or removing bushes and shrubs, and limiting access to your barns, coops, and cages.

On top of this, keeping the area around these vulnerable spaces clear of vegetation may invite weasels to use for cover.

2. Motion-activated Sprinklers

Something else to consider is motion-activated sprinklers. Experts say these sprinklers are an excellent way to repel weasels and other pests. These sprinklers come in the fundamental variables that need hooking up to a hose-free version that needs to be refilled with water regularly.

The sprinklers will detect rodents and other animals, including weasels, and spray them with a burst of water. This will scare the animals in question and prevent them from going near any of the vulnerable areas you want to deter them the most.

Strategically placing the sprinklers is key to keeping weasels out of your barn and from harming your animals. You can install these sprinklers where you don’t want weasels to get in.

You can mount sprinklers in front of the barn or shed entryways. This adds a defensive shield around coops, the base of trees, or walls. Overall, they provide protection all around the perimeter of your home.

3. Fencing

The last thing we discuss in this article is your first line of defense. Setting up adequate fencing will help prevent weasels from coming onto your property first, instead of using chain link fencing, which weasels can crawl straight through.

Consider using a wooden fence with very few or no gaps between the planks of wood. You can also dig a hole about a foot deep when installing your wall and put in a steel mesh on the bottom of your fence that goes underground.

This will not only keep weasels from digging under your fence and getting onto your property but also keep other digging animals out of your yard, something like foxes. 

Ensuring your property is as uninviting as possible is key to keeping weasels off of it and your animals safe. 

Final Thoughts

Weasels are small and cute creatures. However, they can be an utter nightmare at the same time. Their bites hurt, and they can attack and kill your chickens and chicks for food. Hopefully, this article has provided you with the information you need to keep you and your animals the same from these tiny pests.

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Hubert Miles

I've been conducting home inspections for 17 years. I'm a licensed Home Inspector, Certified Master Inspector (CMI), and FHA 203k Consultant. I started HomeInspectionInsider.com to help people better understand the home inspection process and answer questions about homeownership and home maintenance.
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